I have always been interested in the relationship between science and art. Scientifically speaking, dispersed sunlight is the language of the stars. Rainbows are used by astronomers, physicists, and chemists to unlock the mysteries of the universe, as in concepts like the Doppler shift, or the spectral energy distribution shift relative to increased velocity. This may be metaphorically related to a term I call "cultural velocity." As our cultural velocity increases, I find spectral shifts/changes in our environment and a distancing of our relationship to the natural world. Some changes are constructive but many are cataclysmic, leading to the crises of culture and environment that we find ourselves faced with in the present day.  

 

Along with my photography, film, painting and sculpture,  I  constructed my own optically clear dispersive lens in 1990.  The lens composition is of my own, custom, lead crystal recipe.  This lens allows me to render in rainbows, never using digital facsimiles but only natural sunlight, which has a quality that cannot be matched by artificial light. Culturally, the rainbow is an iconic, universal symbol of hope and healing. Many cultures use the symbol as the bridge between man and the divinity, or reality and myth.   For some native peoples, it is considered to be a sign from God, marking a time of great change.  The “whirling rainbow prophecy” tells of a time when all races will come together in unification to heal the earth and all her children.   Through my work in rainbows, I am grappling, as all artists of the 21st century must, with the imminent threat of climate change and other environmental issues. 

 

Much of my content also references prehistoric cultures, older than 10,000 years, whose relationships to physical environment was intimate, and where the first storytelling traditions developed. Evidence of these cultures, such as the paintings found in the Lascaux caves in France, or the handprints imprinted Cueva de los Manos in Argentina shows that these ancient people were the earliest creators of dreams and myth, but their tales were always rooted in the realities of their physical world. Artists are the bridge between myth and reality. As an artist, I follow the sun and the earth’s cycles in order to make my work, just as my ancient ancestors did, and am interested in restoring these ancient cultural links.

  

The concept of "humanity" is a relatively new idea when one considers the long history of our species, and by its very definition it suggests or infers a separation with the natural world. If we are to survive as a species, we must either  redefine our conventional notions of humanity, or discard the concept completely. An investigation of the relationship been man and the natural world is a critical piece of the solution.